How to Create Lucrative Videos with Patricia Kelikani

#36: Patricia Kelikani, an award winning filmmaker and video marketer, shares how to create high-quality videos that will help fuel your business growth, even if you’re completely new to video creation.

Patricia dives deep into the fundamentals of quality video production and gives us a ton of practical tips to help us look and sound like a pro on camera.

If you’re looking to get started with video marketing or you want to take your video production to the next level, you’ll definitely want to listen to this episode.

Podcast Episode Summary

In this episode, you will learn:

  • how she discovered her love for documentary film-making
  • how she’s empowering entrepreneurs on how to use video and make the right kind of videos to get them awesome results
  • why you should invest in videos
  • how to stand up to the “three mean girls” in your life
  • the four filming basics to a quality looking video to get you started
  • how to put yourself in front of the camera (just showing up and being confident and not being afraid to put yourself out there)
  • how to look better on video
  • how to integrate your videos into your site to increase engagements

Quotables

A video (evergreen) has a lifespan of four years. So you just have to make it once and it’ll continue to build your leads, right. And make you sales. (07:33)

It’s all about just taking that first step and taking that time to learn those skills. Because once you have those skills. (08:13)

I don’t know anyone who loves the sound of their voice on video either. But it’s really just like embracing who you are and knowing that when you do make a video, you’re making such a bigger impact on those that you’re serving and in your business. And so think about what it can do for you and for the people that you’re serving. (09:04)

We think that other people are going to criticize ourselves when we make a video or whenever we get out of our comfort zone. But the fact is we are our own worst critics. (10:47)

Make sure that you end the video with a call to action. Because a video without a call to action is like meeting your soulmate but not giving them your phone number. (17:40)

People don’t read our content in our tone. They read it in their tone and their tone has baggage. So let’s say someone goes to your website, they had a bad day, they’re stressed out…They’re not going to read the text in the way that you intend for it to be read…If they click play and they actively see you smiling at them and you’re looking at them straight in the eye as you’re cheerfully telling them how you can make their life better, that’s a game-changer. (27:09)

Techy Terms

  1. Lav Mic – A lavalier microphone or lavalier (also known as a lav, lapel mic, clip mic, body mic, collar mic, neck mic or personal mic)…are most commonly provided with small clips for attaching to collars, ties, or other clothing. (Source)
  2. Boom Mic – used primarily in film purposes, where the microphone should be positioned close to the audio source without appearing in the frame of the shot. (Source)
  3. Jump Cut – a cut in film editing in which two sequential shots of the same subject are taken from camera positions that vary only slightly if at all. This type of edit gives the effect of jumping forwards in time. (Source)
  4. B-roll – B-roll footage is the secondary video footage shot outside of the primary (or A-roll) footage. It is often spliced together with the main footage to bolster the story, create dramatic tension, or further illustrate a point. (Source)
  5. Teleprompter – also commonly referred to as a prompter or Autocue, is a device that allows a presenter to read a script whilst maintaining direct eye contact with the audience. (Source) Anatomy of a Teleprompter

Tools

External Mic – BOYA By-M1

Teleprompter Apps:

Reference Videos

Filming Basics: Video Composition

Sign up for Patricia’s Free Training Videos: https://lucrativevideos.com/training

Connect with Patricia Kelikani

Website

Twitter 

Youtube

Instagram

Facebook

Ep. 36: How to Create Lucrative Videos with Patricia Kelikani

Patricia (00:01):

When someone comes to our website, most of us don't have a video. It's maybe some texts and like a photo of ourselves or a photo of our product. And the problem with that though is that people don't read our content in our tone. They read it in their tone. And their tone has baggage. So let's say someone goes to your website, they had a bad day, they're stressed out, maybe their kids are just crazy. Maybe they have a migraine, whatever it is, and they view your website. They're not going to read the text in the way that you intend for it to be read. Whereas supposed like if they click play and they actively see smiling at them and you're looking at them straight in the eye as you're cheerfully telling them how you can make their life better, that's a game changer.

Josiah (00:54):

That was Patricia Patricia Kelikani, an award winning filmmaker and video marketer and in this episode she shares how to create high quality videos that will help fuel your business growth even if you're completely new to video creation. Patricia dives deep into the fundamentals of quality video production and gives us a ton of practical tips to help us look and sound like a pro on camera. If you're looking to get started with video marketing or you want to take your video production to the next level, you'll definitely want to listen to this episode. So let's jump in.

Announcer (01:25):

You're listening to the Content Heroes podcast where entrepreneurs, marketers, and creatives share how they build profitable businesses on their own terms by creating content online. And now your host, Josiah Goff.

Josiah (01:41):

Welcome to Content Heroes, everyone. I am here with Patricia Kelikani, who is an award winning filmmaker and video marketer who helps businesses grow with video. And I'm very excited about this conversation. Patricia, thanks so much for being on the show today.

Patricia (01:54):

Hey, it's so good to be here Josiah.

Josiah (01:57):

So I would love to hear your story of how you got in to video marketing and how that led to you winning an Emmy.

Patricia (02:06):

Yeah. So when I was younger I wanted to be like Lois lane. Which sounds, it's kind of embarrassing to say now. 'Cause like every other woman my age says they want to be like Oprah Winfrey. And I wanted to be a character out of a comic book who wasn't even a superhero, but really I just, I loved just the way that she lived this adventurous life and she got to unveil these cool stories and she had Superman. How does a man look good in glasses and tights? Does that happen? Yes. So in college I graduated with broadcast journalism degree and political science major, too. And I was so excited to live this TV news reporting, like career, a dream of mine. And when I applied for jobs, even in the middle of nowhere, right? Like places like small towns, haven't even heard of them, I got this same feedback over and over again, which is, your hair is too long, your voice is too high pitched and you look too young. So long story short, I ended up taking the first job I've already got, which was actually a huge nonprofit and I ended up creating a whole new department that focused on increasing their revenue with video. So that's how all began.

Josiah (03:32):

That's amazing. So how did that end up leading to you being part of a film-making project that won an Emmy?

Patricia (03:40):

I had this really awesome boss who knew I had a love for video because I, when I first took the job, nothing with my role had to do with video. It's all writing, storytelling, photographs, that type of a thing. And this was back in like the early 2000s before video is like even a thing. So he said, Hey, I want to send you on assignment to Albania to cover this story and why don't you take this video camera with you and see what happens. And this is like a camcorder. It costs $2,000 like, I mean the iPhone 6s were better than this. So I was like, alright, let's do this. And that's when I discovered my passion for documentary film-making. I came back and ended up editing a video and my boss called in the president of the organization and the next thing I knew, they were sending me on assignment all over the world to shed light on these stories. I realized then that holy cow, like this is so much better than Lois Lane. So, so it was so awesome. And then that led to a television show, a documentary series that we started like on local television and now it airs nationally on PBS and is also on Amazon prime video. So it's kind of how it all started. And then it's when, you know, Emmy awards and all that fun stuff, which is really cool. So

Josiah (05:05):

That's amazing. Okay, so let's talk about where you are now because now you've sort of stepped out on your own and you're helping businesses grow with video. What does that look like?

Patricia (05:14):

Yeah, so you know, I started doing this, boy, basically I want to say year and a half ago. So when I had my first baby almost six years ago now, I actually resigned from that full-time job and started my own business. And within that, thankfully that employer became one of my first clients and they still are, which is amazing. But then within this, I was also meeting with potential clients who are small business owners. And I realized that a lot of them didn't have the budget to hire out video. And so I thought, oh man, if, if they just knew the simple skills and foundations, they can make their own videos and still get amazing results. So that's when I launched my YouTube channel like a year and a half ago. And then this past year launched my online courses and all of that stuff. And so yeah, now what I do is I basically empower entrepreneurs on how to use video and make the right kind of videos to get them awesome results.

Josiah (06:18):

That's amazing. So what I'm curious about is how you help people understand why they should invest in video. Because one of the things that, you know, I also talked with a lot of small businesses at my agency and one of the things that I hear all the time, and I hear a lot of objections around wanting to start video. Like, you know, I'm not going to be good on camera. I don't know what to say. I don't know, you know, how to make a video not look like a second grader shot at, you know, like there are a lot of excuses that come up or objections that come up that to them make it seem like it's not worth their effort. So I'm curious how you respond to those objections or questions.

Patricia (07:05):

Oh man. Okay. It's so worth it. And let me throw out just some statistics and research statistics. Okay. So Aberdeen research found that businesses that use video grow revenue 49% faster. And then, let's see here, HubSpot found that 64% of customers say that seeing a video, it makes them more likely to buy. And the list goes on and on, like a video, like an evergreen video. So not like a Facebook live or something like that. But a video has a lifespan of four years. So you just have to make it once and it'll continue to build your leads, right. And make you sales. And then as far as like not knowing how to do it, thinking back to when we were a kids, right? Or even if you were an adult, we didn't always know how to ride a bike, right? But we like took that first step, risked it. We were scared to take off those training wheels. Of course now they have like Strider or whatever that brand is, which is super awesome for kids now. But it's like you think about what we've done, even swimming, right? Like you wouldn't just throw someone in the pool in the deep end and expect them to swim 10 laps. So it's all about just taking that first step and taking that time to learn those skills. Because once you have those skills, you will have them forever. And it actually is more simple than we think.

Josiah (08:29):

I love that. Absolutely. I think that most of the time it's just these stories that are in our heads that are convincing us that we can't do it.

Patricia (08:39):

Josiah, I call them the three mean girls and it's really, it's like the voice in our head that's like, you know, just putting us down and like giving us these excuses. But yeah, I know. It really is. It's changing our mindset, you know? And thinking about, hey, what could be like, yes, I don't like seeing myself on video. I don't think, I don't think anyone's like seeing themselves on video. I don't know anyone who loves the sound of their voice on video either. Right? But it's really just like embracing who you are and knowing that when you do make a video, you're making such a bigger impact on those that you're serving and in your business. And so think about what it can do for you and for the people that you're serving.

Josiah (09:33):

Yeah, absolutely. The thing that comes up for me when I start creating any kind of content really, but video, it definitely can seem like the scariest because you know, there's no hiding while on the podcast. I mean, you and I can see each other, but no one else can see me. And so, you know, I don't have to look all professional or even showered. You and I both have small kids. So we know there's some days we just can't get to it. The three mean girls, which I absolutely love that visual because I am a huge fan of the movie Mean Girls. It's a cult classic, but they're trying to keep us safe, right? Cause it can feel so vulnerable to put yourself out there, especially on video because there's so much more that people can criticize when they see you in that form. Like it's really high fidelity form. And so the thing that I like to remind myself is like, when have I ever regretted stepping out and being vulnerable? Because every time I do, that's when amazing things happen.

Patricia (10:43):

Yes. So true. And the thing is too, we think that other people are going to criticize ourselves when we make a video or whenever we get out of our comfort zone. But the fact is we are our own worst critics, you know, like ourselves. So we just have to remember that. And I remember, it's so funny. So I'm a twin. And we're very protective of each other. Before I, made my YouTube videos public, like before I publish them, I showed them to my twin sister. You know, cause I decided like on my YouTube videos, like I would just, I want to be myself. Like I want to show my silly side, I want to show like this side actually I don't show unless I'm like with my close-knit like friends. And so I'm showing my twin sister these videos and she was like, it was so funny cause she was like, really? Yeah. I don't know. Like those aren't, it's not like that professional. And she was like really timid, kind of like the voice in my head. Right. Cause we're like identical twins and, but then it's hilarious because once I made them publish, I decided to go for it. And once I publish them and shared it, all of the feedback was like, Oh my goodness, I just love you. Oh we love your personality. Oh you're so, you know, blah blah blah. And it was just like praising me and then my twin sister. It was like, wow, it really did work. It was really funny.

Josiah (12:08):

Oh, I love that. Yeah. I experienced the same thing when I started the podcast. I had a lot of voices in my head of, you know, people are gonna think that you're an imposter or you don't know what you're talking about and you, you can't speak well, you're not a good communicator. And I've gotten nothing but positive feedback from the show. You're absolutely right. Like it's just a testament to how those voices in our heads are the worst. They really are the mean girls.

Patricia (12:40):

It's so true. And I think too, so like, like when it comes to video, basically your goal is to transform that camera from feeling like it's a monster or a bad ex-boyfriend or a bad ex-girlfriend to your bestfriend. Right? So it's getting that comfort, like getting comfortable with your camera, whether that's your phone, whether it's, you know, a DSLR, whatever you're using. And once you can get to that level of comfort, which takes practice, like it's not going to happen instantly. But that's when it's just, you know, smooth sailing. It's like, it's like again, going back to riding a bike, it's like, yeah, you don't even have to think about it. Right.

Josiah (13:22):

Fantastic. Going through your YouTube channel, one of the things that I love about the work that you do is you do make it seem really easy for people to get started. And I think that that's really important because of everything that we just talked about, how video can seem really intimidating. So what advice can you give people who are listening to the show right now on how they can get started with video?

Patricia (13:45):

You can start with your phone. It's crazy how nowadays, like we have great cameras in our back pockets or in our handbags. So that's where I encourage people when you're just starting out, just pull out your phone and then from there, you know, you want to think about basically there are four filming basics to a quality looking video. So number 1 is lighting and you can go ahead and buy lights. There are lots of budget-friendly options out there. Or before you even buy a light, just sit in front of your window, make sure you're in indirect sunlight, so the actual sun rays are not shining on you. But yeah, just sit in front of a window a few feet away and that really does wonders. Number 2 you is audio, so make sure you're in a quiet room. I like to use an external microphone and you can get one on Amazon that you plug into your phone for $20, it's the BOYA BY-M1, and that works super well, makes you sound great too. Number 3 is stabilization, right? So you want to make sure that your camera, your phone, whatever you're using is stable. I personally prefer a tripod just because it's really versatile. You can like put it wherever you want, but of course if you don't want to buy anything yet, just put it on a stack of books. Lean against something, makes sure it's framed right, which leads us to number four and that's framing. Just make sure that there isn't a ton of space above your head that you're not chopped off, that type of thing. Check out my YouTube video that I have on this. It's kind of fun. I take you to the San Diego zoo and show you, show you all the framing tips. But yeah, those are like the four filming basics that makes a quality looking video.

Josiah (15:35):

Love it. So that makes it sound super easy to get started because pretty much everyone has a phone these days. I love that you are recommending an external mic because that is one of my pet peeves with videos is like a video can look really good, but if the audio is poor, like I'm just not, it's just so distracting from whatever it is that you're trying to convey what your messages. That mic that you recommend, is that like a, is that a lav mic or is that like a boom mic? What does that,

Patricia (16:04):

Yeah, that's a lav mic. And the reason why I like this one and I love boom mics too, but I've tested them out. The ones for your phones and you do have to be pretty close to it for it to actually sound good. So the lav mic, you just pin it on your shirt. And I remember one time I recorded a video at the DFW airport in between layovers and even though loud speakers were blaring and there are people like all around talking and all that stuff, like you could still hear me super clear. And so just like that $20 microphone makes a huge difference. And yeah, I so agree with you, right? Like it can look great, but if you can't really hear them or if it just sounds bad, it's like ugh.

Josiah (16:48):

So you've got your basic setup, got your phone set up, you've got a go-to tripod, you've got a mic that delivers quality audio, you learn how to frame things. The next step is you've got to get in front of the camera, right? And so what are some tips you can give us on just showing up and being confident and not being afraid to put yourself out there?

Patricia (17:12):

Okay. So number one, know what you're going to say before you obviously push record. And so figure that out. Know what type of video you're making. And there were so many, like you could do live videos, right, with quick wins, like how-to videos. I think those make great live videos or you can make evergreen videos. So videos for your website, videos for YouTube, that type of a thing. So know what you're going to say and what your goal is. Make sure that you end the video with a call to action as well. Cause I say a video without a call to action is like meeting your soulmate but not giving them your phone number, right? So make sure you have your messaging ready. You know, just have talking points or an outline. Just kind of jot that down. Or even a script like whatever suits your fancy. And then two is there are colors that will make us look better on video. Did you know that?

Josiah (18:09):

I did, but only because I also used to do film-making. So.

Patricia (18:13):

I know, that's right! Which is so cool.

Josiah (18:13):

But most people don't know that.

Patricia (18:18):

Okay, here's a question, Josiah. Did you know that everyone is a season when it comes to color?

Josiah (18:25):

I'd heard that but I don't understand what it means at all.

Patricia (18:30):

Okay, so, so here's the thing. Each one of us is a color season and it's either fall, winter, spring or a summer, right? Just like the seasons that we have. And you can Google it. There were like tons of tests online. Go ahead and take one. I'm a winter. And so like basically what you want to do is you want to look at the color palette that looks best on you, which you'll find out whether you know what season you are. So look at your color palette and then from there choose the colors that are the brighter and jeweled colors. So like navys definitely look better than black. Fuchsia is a bright color, teal, emerald green, another jewel, it's color, like those types of colors that compliment your skin tone, your hair color, all of that will really make you look great. Like it just flatters the way like your face and all of that. So it makes a huge difference. And then for women rather than wearing like a small pendant necklace or like small earrings or something like that, wear statement pieces that people can actually see on the video. Statement, earrings, statement, necklaces, that type of a thing. Just make sure they don't like clink or make noise because that's gonna you know obviously, but it's distracting. And another thing is try to stick with like more solid colors as opposed to like, you know, graphic tee shirts or like a lot of like just like huge kind of complex designs, that type of a thing. So that says a lot. And then of course one of the things right that we talked about earlier was that we're worried about the way we look, right, on video. So I say like stylize yourself, like if you feel more confident about the way you look by curling your hair like I do, then go ahead and do that. Or if you want to get a haircut before you push record for like your first video, do that by all means. Because that extra boost of confidence is going to just show in your video like people are going to see, see and feel your confidence from that. And yeah, just go for it. Don't feel like, Oh I should just be comfortable with who I am. Even if I don't really like my hair today. It's like, you know, just go for it and like yeah, a curl that hair and get that haircut.

Josiah (20:55):

I love it. So I'm really curious for you in your own process when you're creating a video, you know you mentioned you can write a script, you can do an outline, but you want to make sure you understand what your goal is and kind of big picture of what you're trying to say. I'm curious how you go about it. Do you read a script? Do you have like a prompter. I know a lot of people who do that or do you just have an outline and just kind of let it go? Do you take multiple takes so you can edit them together later or like what does that look like for you?

Patricia (21:23):

All of the above. I really, I do all of those. I mean not for each video but like, okay. Like yesterday I filmed a couple of videos and yesterday I typed up the rough draft of this script is what I did. And then from there I literally just pushed record, reviewed my notes and then I recorded it in sections. And so the first two paragraphs basically I said then, I looked down at my notes and then I said like my next section of notes. And then that way when I'm editing I just cut all of that out and I cover up the jump cuts, which is the part where, how would you explain a jump cut, Josiah?

Josiah (22:06):

I would call it when it's obvious that your face is cut from what you're talking about from one frame to the next, it's not as smooth. Is that what you're talking about?

Patricia (22:16):

Exactly. Yeah. So like, yeah, like your head may be ends in that shot, like on the left side, but then it was all always on the right hand side, something like that. So you want to cover that up.

Josiah (22:27):

It's like a glitch in the matrix.

Patricia (22:29):

Yeah, and I love to cover it up with B-roll, which is supplemental video footage or graphics, that type of a thing. But then also there is some days where like maybe I want it just kind of record like four videos all at once. Then sometimes I will use a teleprompter. It really just depends like how comfortable I feel that day. Just also using a teleprompter. It makes the editing faster. So yeah, I do all of the above.

Josiah (23:02):

what do you use for a teleprompter? I'm curious.

Patricia (23:05):

There are two teleprompters that I recommend. So if you're filming your videos on your iPhone, then it's an app called: Video Teleprompter app for the iPhone. And that one is like super easy. They have a free version. And then of course like all apps, they have some paid versions. And then if you're using like a DSLR camera, I liked Prof. Hornet, that app and you just put it like on your iPad or even your iPhone and it works great. You could, you know like edit it in a way so it's just to your, you know, the speed that the words pop up or you want them to all that stuff. So those are the two apps that I like.

Josiah (23:46):

That's awesome. So do you put the iPad next to the camera or do you use one of those teleprompter hoods that projects it, looks like you're looking right into the camera.

Patricia (23:55):

Yeah. So with my DSLR then yeah, I do use one of those hoods. Like it basically is a mirror. It has the reflection of the iPad. But then the iPhone app is actually, it's run on your phone as you're recording. And so that one's really handy because it's kind of an all-in-one thing. The thing though that you really have to be careful though with teleprompters is you have to make sure that it looks like you're not reading. So it takes some practice. Like your whole goal for doing this video is to make your viewer feel like they're talking with you in real life. And in real life we don't talk to people and look like we're reading. We also don't look shifty-eyed. Right. So like, right, like people will put their notes on the side of the camera and then they'll like look at their notes, not move their face, just their eyes and then like look back at the lens. And it's like no, no, don't do that because that defeats the whole purpose of you doing the video. And so for live videos you can definitely get away with that and just kind of say like, okay, let me take a look at my notes here. Then you know, go back. That type of a thing.

Josiah (25:10):

Yeah. And if you're like me and you've been putting off for years, getting glasses, even though you know you need them, probably go get some glasses or contacts. So you're not just squinting at the camera the whole time.

Patricia (25:23):

That's true. It's a common question I get is how do I fill myself without getting a glare in my glasses. And so the key to that is putting your light source. So like if you have an X, like a light, like a soft box or a ring light, even a window, you want to put your light source on the side of you and you won't get that glare. You have to test it out and see what works. And then once you figure it out, you're good to go for all of your videos. So,

Josiah (25:52):

Awesome. Cool. So now that we've got this amazing video that we recorded and we're feeling confident, we've got the lighting right and it sounds great and we're not squinting into a teleprompter, what do we do with it? I mean, I know we can post it to YouTube. That's kind of our strategy of what we're doing. But if we're wanting to like say in the context of our website, use video to increase engagement and conversions and that sort of thing, how do we go about like what, what are your recommendations for starting to integrate that into our site?

Patricia (26:24):

Okay. So first before you even push record, choose what type of video you want to make. So let's say you want to make a video for your homepage, right? Which I think it's so important because when you think of like brick-and-mortar places, right? Like stores, we'll walk into a store and will be greeted by someone who works there and it's just that like added interpersonal communication. And that real life connection makes a big difference. And when someone comes to our website, most of us don't have a video. It's maybe some texts and like a photo of ourselves or a photo of our product. And the problem with that though is that people don't read our content in our tone. They read it in their tone and their tone has baggage. So let's say someone goes to your website, they had a bad day, they're stressed out. Maybe their kids are just crazy. Maybe they have a migraine, whatever it is, and they view your website. They're not going to read the text in the way that you intend for it to be read, which you probably want them to read it like, Hey, I'm such and such and I help you with blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. They're going to read it like, Hey, I'm blah, blah, blah. Why help you with this? Okay, I'll skim through this. Whereas supposed like if they click play and they actively see you smiling at them and you're looking at them straight in the eye as you're cheerfully telling them how you can make their life better, that's a game-changer. And then of course right, you want to leave it with a call to action by downloading your freebie or whatever it is, right? Taking them further down that journey and have them just convert into a customer. That's how it all starts. And so yeah, having a video for a homepage is so important. And so just make sure it's strategic that you plan it out, you want to greet them, you want to empathize with what their problems are, their frustrations are. You want to share with a transformation is that you can give them and then leave them with a call to action. Another great video, and really I think this is probably when that's easy to start with is it a website, banner video. So you know like there's ones on websites that don't have any audio. It's just like images with like text over it and like a call to action button. So these are so great because number one, you don't necessarily have to be in this video, although if you are, if you are like a business coach or a life coach or something like that, then you should be in the video, but you don't have to talk. And so what I love about it is you visually share your brands theme, like what feelings you want your target audience to feel like you would visually display that. You visually just display the transformation that they'll get. And so when they first click and open up your website, bam, they're going to feel exactly how you want them to feel. They're going to be engaged and you're going to then take them along this journey to watch your homepage video. And then from there it's kind like dating. Your website banner video is like, it's like you catching their eye, right? And then the homepage video is like, you know, I think I want to go up to them and talk to them. And then that's like when they click play on your homepage video and then they ask you on a date by, you know, downloading your optin and watching your video sales letter and all that stuff. So that's kind of like the whole website journey in a nutshell.

Josiah (30:07):

Oh, that's fantastic. I love it. So Patricia, this has been fantastic. I really appreciate you coming on the show. Before we hop off, can you tell everybody where they can find you online?

Patricia (30:17):

Yeah, so you can go to lucrativevideos.com/training and that's where I have a free training video and guide on how to film yourself professionally on a phone. And then on like social media and YouTube, you can find me @ my name, which is Patricia Kelikani, and I know my last name is Hawaiian. And so everyone's probably thinking, how do I spell that? I'm sure you'll have in the show notes. So yeah, that's where you can find me.

Josiah (30:47):

Fantastic. Yeah, we'll definitely link all that up in the show notes. And I know that you've probably inspired a lot of people in the audience today to start creating video. I know you've inspired me to start creating more video because there's a connection that video creates that none of the other mediums do in the same way, especially on your website. So everyone out there, if you haven't started with video, definitely go out and go to Patricia's site, which I said we'll link in the show notes and check out her free resources. They're really great and once again, thanks for being on the show and to everyone out there go be a hero.

Josiah (31:24):

Hey everyone, thank you for listening to the Content Heroes podcast. I just wanted to take a second and let you know that we have some amazing guests planned for the coming weeks, so if you haven't already, go ahead and hit subscribe so you can make sure to catch every episode. And if you enjoyed today's episode, go ahead and leave a five-star review to help make it easier for other content creators to find and enjoy the show. Lastly, I'd like to invite you to join our Content Heroes Facebook community where you can connect with other online content creators to share, learn, grow, and have fun. To join the group, just visit contentheroes.com/facebook. Once again, that's contentheroes.com/facebook.

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