The Rise of Awkward Marketing with Rachael Kay Albers

#35: Rachael Kay Albers, creative director and business comedian, shares how creating her hilarious Awkward Marketing videos, that entertain as much as they educate, skyrocketed her business’s growth.

Rachael also gives us her secret to consistently publish high quality content without getting burned out, as well the distribution strategy she uses to get as many people as possible to view her videos.

Podcast Episode Summary

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • what makes her different from all the other marketers in the industry
  • her unconventional business growth strategy (aka how-do-I-afford-to-buy-a-taco-tonight strategy)
  • why the content approach that she’s taken works so well and what one of the ingredients of a binge-worthy content is
  • her unique format for delivering her message and teaching marketing on the internet
  • how to consistently produce honest and sustainable content
  • how she measures the value of Awkward Marketing
  • her unique approach to distributing the videos

Quotables

You cannot build an epic, unforgettable brand without solid ongoing content. (10:30)

I always teach my own clients (about creating their content) not to invest all this time and money in a theory of what you think is going to work. Start small, start scrappy, start crappy, even figure out what lands and then invest in that. (11:28)

it’s not about saying something new. It’s not about reinventing the wheel. Everybody’s really obsessed with coming up with this idea that no one has ever thought of before. That’s a losing battle. (13:55)

Laughter isn’t just a gimmick. Laughter helps us learn faster. Laughter helps us remember things. Laughter helps get our hormones and chemicals flowing so that we’re better problem solvers. It releases stress, all these things. (15:48)

I like to tell people that my best content comes from stuff that pisses me off. (17:31)

Small business owners need to be doing a lot of their own marketing in-house, even if they delegate and outsource parts of it. Most small business owners cannot afford a full-time marketing team. So you’re going to have to develop marketing skills whether you like it or not. If you want to succeed in this economy right now, I really urge people to find the places with their content that they derive joy because otherwise it’s not going to be sustainable. (21:07)

The dream for most businesses is we want to get to the point where we can afford a full-time marketing team, but to get there, you have to become a marketer. And so find the places in your own content that do bring you personal joy because if it wasn’t for the joy, I wouldn’t spend those long hours doing this show, but I do consider it very, very worth it. (21:46)

I think a lot of marketers go wrong because they expect their content to give them huge returns right away. (23:01)

The content you create today is a gift you give your future self. (23:23)

Part of how I measure the value of Awkward Marketing isn’t just how much business it brings me, but how much more profitable it is making my company because my customers are coming in educated, already indoctrinated into our worldview, and so that’s another huge way that awkward marketing in that my content is paying me back. (25:17)

I find that when people take their content, and they only focus on one platform and then they try to drive everyone back to that platform, they lose people there. (28:01)

Resources

Derek Halpern’s 80/20 Rule for Building a Blog Audience

RKA’s reverse-niching

Connect with Rachael Kay Albers

Website: AwkwardMarketing.com

Youtube: AwkwardMarketing.tv

Ep. 35: The Rise of Awkward Marketing with Rachael Kay Albers

Rachael (00:01):

We know that laughter isn't just a gimmick. Laughter helps us learn faster. Laughter helps us remember things. Laughter helps get our hormones and like chemicals flowing so that we're better problem solvers. It releases stress, all these things. And so that was my angle to help people learn things. I hear it all the time. People will say, Oh my God, I've heard this concept 20 times from everybody else in this industry, but when I saw it on Awkward Marketing, I finally got it. And that's what I'm trying to contribute here. Just different way of getting to people and helping them understand these concepts and having fun while we do it.

Josiah (00:35):

That was Rachael Kay Albers, Creative Director and Business Comedian. And in this episode she shares how creating her hilarious Awkward Marketing videos that entertain as much as they educate, skyrocketed her business's growth. Rachel also gives us her secret to consistently publishing high quality content without getting burned out as well as the distribution strategy she uses to get as many people as possible to view her videos. This episode is jam-packed with laughs and valuable takeaways and I can't wait to share it with you. So let's jump in.

Announcer (01:08):

You're listening to the Content Heroes podcast where entrepreneurs, marketers, and creatives share how they build profitable businesses on their own terms by creating content online. And now your host, Josiah Goff.

Josiah (01:24):

Welcome to Content Heroes, everyone. I'm here with Rachael Kay Albers who is a Creative Director and Business Comedian. And I am very much looking forward to this conversation. So Rachel, thanks so much for being on the show.

Rachael (01:34):

My gosh, it's the best day of my life and that's saying something 'cause it's trying times right now.

Josiah (01:39):

Yes it is. Before we jump into what it is that you do, can we start with your origin story, how you got started?

Rachael (01:46):

Oh my gosh, where do we start? I never started out to be an entrepreneur to start my own business. I was in law school when I started my business and I had gotten this internship while in law school in Southern Mexico working with young women. And I went down there and I fell in love with doing this work and realized I didn't want to be a lawyer. And so my question was how the heck do I stay in this foreign country and fund my pro bono work here without taking a job in the local economy? Oh, I have a background in marketing, I have a background in design. I got a computer. And at the time there was a website called Elance, which is now turned into what we know as Upwork. And I got my butt on Elance and I just started bidding on projects and that was it. There was never this vision of I'm starting a business. It was how do I continue doing this work with young women? So I built up my agency in Mexico over about seven years. And over that period of time kind of fell in love with being an entrepreneur, but it was the backwards way. I never planned to like quit my job. And live the digital nomad life. I just sort of happened to me and fell in love and built the business up over time and kind of through that realized, Oh crap, this is what I want to do with the rest of my life. So fast forward a few more years, I've moved the family back to the United States. I met my husband in Mexico, we moved back up here, we had a little girl and now here we are right outside of Chicago running a digital marketing and web design agency and having a damn good time.

Josiah (03:08):

So you went from law school to shifting over to basically your business was kind of your side hustle, but it was there to fund what you're passionate about, which is fantastic.

Rachael (03:21):

It turned into my passion in that process. And I changed my perspective on the work that I was doing in Mexico. You know, I was a American, a white woman in a place that I had a lot of white savior issues to work out around like what is my role here? Do they really need me? Right? Or is this only for my ego? And I had a complicated relationship with that. Towards the end of the time that I was working in Mexico and ultimately decided that I felt that my presence might be more of an imposition than a help. And that shift kind of happened where I started focusing more on the business, which was this accidental thing that I had started. And yeah, so that's a whole story you didn't ask for Josiah, but I got to give the real talk about my time in Mexico cause a lot of people focus on, Oh you were doing this non-profit work and it was great. And I do think that we did a lot of good. However, I had some second thoughts about doing this international work kind of midway through and I changed my position on it.

Josiah (04:17):

I love that I'm all about the real talk here. Like we tend to gloss over a lot of stuff when we're talking about our business and what we do in our story. Oh yeah. I left my job and I grew an agency from zero to six figures in this first year. But there's so much, there's so much craft in there, in between.

Rachael (04:36):

Right?

Josiah (04:36):

And partially it's because people want to be inspired. And partially it's because like if we went through all of that, we'd be sitting here for four hours and I don't know how many people want to listen to a four-hour podcast episode. But I love that because it takes a good deal of self awareness to like come to that conclusion and then actually do something about it. That's fantastic. So now that you've come back to the States, legit started an agency, what did that look like?

Rachael (05:01):

So the agency already existed, the transition back to the States was only challenging in so far as my cost of living and my overhead expanded exponentially. So that was one benefit of starting a business not in the United States. As I had started doing this in an economy that could support me making very little in the first few years. So that's a good example of the behind the scenes of growing in an agency. Because those first few years I made nothing. I mean, I started my business right at the tail end of the last recession when everything was falling apart. So in those years I really truly made very little. Like, I can't even imagine how I lived on it now. So yeah, coming back to the States, the big challenge was, is the agency making enough money to make this transition? That was the big thing. And so I was really proud of the fact that we had grown the agency to the place where I could move my family back to the United States and support us. You know, because I'm our sole earner, my husband is a stay at home dad. He takes care my daughter. And so that was the big thing. But other than that, you know, I had been running the agency for awhile. And because I've built it remotely, I never had anybody working with me in house, like in a brick and mortar, despite having some brick and mortar locations where I worked over the years. That made it easy. Right? In fact, moving from Mexico to the Chicago, my time zone didn't even changed the central time zone in both places. So it was more seamless than you would expect, actually. It was great. And I'll tell you this, people always ask me when I got back at the end of 2016 they'd be like, Oh, what's the thing that you love most about being back in the States? Cause I had been gone for basically ears and I was like, they expect me to say my mom or something like heartwarming my family being close to my family. And I'm like no. The number one thing I'm most happy about about our move back to the States is the internet speed. 'Cause I went from like AOL dial-up speeds basically down in Mexico up here. I feel like things are happening before I even do them. Right? That's how fast it is. So that was actually a really positive part of the transition.

Josiah (06:55):

Yeah. So we live in Chattanooga, Tennessee now. We've moved around quite a bit, but we're kind of back sort of where we started. This is where we lived when we got married. That is one thing that I do love about Chattanooga is it was the first city in the US to offer gigabit broadband ethernet, like fiber to homes before Google fiber started and all that stuff. Their local electric power board ran fiber throughout the city and started offering it everywhere downtown, like all the coffee shops have like minimum, like a hundred up and a hundred down.

Rachael (07:23):

Oh my God.

Josiah (07:24):

I have a gig here at my apartment and so even though like I'm on wifi, I get like 400 up and down. It's pretty fantastic.

Rachael (07:30):

I'm moving to Tennessee.

Josiah (07:33):

Come on down.

Rachael (07:34):

Yes, the volunteer state. Look at you. You're so helpful. I love it.

Josiah (07:39):

So let's dig into your growth strategy for your agency because one, I love how much you just said, I'm gonna let my personality show and put it into what we do. That's always super inspiring to me to see people do that. So let's talk about your growth strategy. In the beginning was Upwork, which is actually how I started my agency, too, which is funny.

Rachael (08:01):

I wouldn't call it a growth strategy that's making it sound a lot more formal than it really was. It was like, how do I eat tonight? Oh, there's a website and I really only had to take a couple jobs on there before, you know, you get referrals in that. I never had to use it again, so, but I love it. Yes. From now on I'm going to start calling it my growth strategy. Like that was my growth strategy. My growth strategy was Elance. How do I afford to buy a taco tonight strategy was Elance, that was the strategy.

Josiah (08:29):

Hey, tacos make you grow. So that's your growth strategy.

Rachael (08:32):

There you go. I love it.

Josiah (08:35):

You started out with Upwork and then you said that you positioned up, was it really referral-based? Like when did you really start getting into creating content for your agency?

Rachael (08:44):

Probably a few years in. I mean my agency grew in the early days by referral because I didn't have a ton of visibility at that time. And even the stuff that I was putting out, even the content I was creating to up, to increase my visibility, I was still finding my voice and I was still figuring out the marketplace and what do people want to hear about and what are they interested, and what makes them engage? And so that takes a few years. So even though I was creating content, I would say probably started creating content pretty much a year out the gate, maybe around 2010 but it wasn't doing much for me. The real impact was coming from my referrals and it took me actually years of creating mediocre, shoddy, nobody cares, content before I kind of locked into the content that was actually going to be part of my growth strategy for my agency. But that didn't happen until I got back to the States. So I spent years trying and testing and playing and working on different approaches 'til I really got the one that nailed it and actually gave me decent, or not even decent, but a significant ROI for my agency versus just being like nebulous brand awareness builder.

Josiah (09:49):

What did that look like when you made that pivot? Was there like a light bulb that went off in your head and like, Oh, this is the direction, or was it kinda more like a slow burn? What did that look like?

Rachael (09:58):

It's always been for me about testing, and tweaking, and pivoting, and testing, and tweaking, and pivoting. And so when I got back to the States, one of the things that I started was I kind of begrudgingly, I was like annoyed by it, resigned myself to - I'm going to have to get on video because this is the future. One of the reasons I really amped up our content strategy for the agency was I wanted us to be walking our talk for our clients. We work with people to help them create epic, unforgettable brands. And we believe that the foundation of that is built with content, right? You cannot build an epic, unforgettable brand without solid ongoing content. And so I knew it was only a matter of time 'til I had to start actually emulating this and modeling it for my clients 'cause they didn't get it, they weren't doing it right. And so I started just getting on Facebook live every week. Doing a Facebook live show, no title to it, just hop on and talk for 20 minutes about marketing. And that's how it began. And then I started experimenting with it, Josiah. And so in June, a couple of months after I had started my Facebook live show in 2017, right after I got back to the States, I decided to play with something crazy. I was like, I'm going to hop on, I'm going to do a live musical. So what I did was Facebook live the musical, a marketing extravaganza where I had costume changes, I had original songs and I performed this whole musical live on the air and I, within a couple of days I had tens of thousands of views on this. People loved it and that was the light bulb there. So it wasn't one big light bulb, it was more like a series of tiny light bulbs pointing you into the next direction. And that's what I always teach my own clients about creating their content is don't invest all this time and money in a theory of what you think is going to work. Start small, start scrappy, start crappy, even figure out what lands and then invest in that. Cause a lot of people dump all of their budget into this idea of what they think is going to work for them and they do that and it doesn't work and they have no money left and no energy left and they're like depleted. So I did a lot of crappy content over the years until I found this and then it was like, Oh wait, this thing is working. Let me lean in harder to this. So that's when I bought a green screen, a bunch of wigs. I upped my video setup, I got better equipment, and then I turned my Facebook live show into a pre-recorded show using characters, and comedy, and sketches. And when I did that, the response was huge and that's when I knew, okay, this is what I'm going to double, triple, quadruple down into. This is what the people want. And it also just happened to be filling a need in the marketplace that wasn't being filled, offering a different approach. All these different things converged to make this the content strategy we were going to go all in on.

Josiah (12:33):

That's fantastic. I also love that the kind of a-ha moment for you was doing a musical. Not a lot of folks know this, but I actually did seven years of show choir through high school and college, so that's my jam. I love that. My high school experience was essentially like the show Glee. I can relate to that.

Rachael (12:56):

You kinda look like a character. You can totally be on Glee, even now. Like when did you graduate? Yesterday or what?

Josiah (13:04):

Oh man. So let's talk about like what you're doing now. When I was looking at your site, I was watching your videos. I'm just cracking up and I love that you essentially take what other people do and you just have so much personality. Most people would create like how-to videos on their agency site or something like that. You're just like, no, I'm just going to have fun and we're going to talk about ridiculous of business and marketing and all of that. But it's entertaining that it like makes me connect with you. And I love that. Let's talk about your approach now of how you continuing to create that content and build an audience and all that.

Rachael (13:42):

Yeah. So you hit upon something that is kind of at the crux of why the content approach I think that I've taken work so well and what really is kind of one of the ingredients of what I call binge-worthy content. And that is, it's not about saying something new. It's not about reinventing the wheel. Everybody's really obsessed with coming up with this idea that no one has ever thought of before. That's a losing battle, right? There's nothing new under the sun. And so my whole focus is, it's not about coming up with a new idea. It's not about what you say, it's about how you're saying it. That's the difference maker here. So with my show with Awkward Marketing, and I've got two kind of types of episodes, some of them are a little bit more entertainment heavy, but my typical episode of the show opens with a sketch. So you have like a little SNL type business comedy sketch and then I go through it, me, RKA, and I break it down and I bring the business lessons in. So there is an element of how-to in there, but it's talked, talked way deep into this entertainment format. So I'm not inventing marketing wisdom that hasn't been spoken about before. And I don't pretend to, I regularly reference my sources, I talk about the people that I follow. So I'm not things in the marketing world that have never been said before. But I am saying them in a different way than anyone else has ever said them. And I found, personally, like when I decided to do this show in this format of sketch comedy and then kind of breaking that down in this funny way, part of it was because I was thinking to myself, okay, there are hundreds if not thousands upon thousands of people talking about marketing on the internet, describing marketing in the internet, giving us the how-to guides from marketing on the internet. But what about if we become the example instead of talking about the example. Who is actually bringing these concepts to life and like playing with them and acting them out and turning them into characters instead of just concepts in our brains. I didn't see anyone doing that. Not in a consistent way the way I'm doing it now. So that's where I came in and that was one of the strategies, one of those, one of my growth strategies, Josiah. Was how do I contribute a different approach and through that approach, because we know that laughter isn't just a gimmick. Laughter helps us learn faster. Laughter helps us remember things. Laughter helps get our hormones and like chemicals flowing so that we're better problem solvers. It releases stress, all these things. And so that was my angle to help people learn things. I hear it all the time. People will say, Oh my God, I've heard this concept 20 times from everybody else in this industry, but when I saw it on Awkward Marketing, I finally got it. And that's what I'm trying to contribute here. Just different way of getting to people and helping them understand these concepts and having fun while we do it and it's been working pretty great. It's been a wonderful ride.

Josiah (16:24):

So I'm really curious about the content that you put out is very high production. There's a lot that goes into it. How do you stay consistent? How do you keep from burning out?

Rachael (16:36):

Well, I will say over the years I've had lots of problems with content burn out. I think most people do, and especially those of us who work in the content industry, often it's like the shoemaker's shoes problem where we can't get around to our own content. So what I ended up designing with Awkward Marketing, and it was kind of, I didn't do it on purpose, but I was producing our second season right as I was about to give birth to my daughter. And so I knew that I wanted to have a ton of content ready for during my maternity and all that kind of stuff. And so, you know, I just batched out pretty much, let's say 15 episodes in a couple of weeks. And then that became then my process because it really worked and it kept me honest. And so when I say batched out, this is what I mean. Let me breakdown my content process for you and how I stay consistent. So throughout the entire year I've got a notebook of ideas that I just keep, I just keep adding to it. If I see a stupid question on Facebook or something that really bothers me or most of my content, my best content I like to tell people comes from stuff that pisses me off. That is my number one source and any piece of content I've ever had that's gone, let's say semi viral or industry viral is from something that made me really mad. No, I turn that into a positive constructive lesson. But if I find myself getting pissed about something, then I opened up my notebook and I write it down 'cause I'm like, Ooh, this is an episode, a topic that I can explore. So then what happens next is around July and August is when I start planning my next season, which is going to go typically from September through May-ish or June of the next year. And that's when I sit down and I take the big notebook of ideas and I go through it and I say, what are the best ideas for episodes. I'm going to grab now from this list, what do I think are the best episodes? And from there I write the sketches. So I decided, okay, how am I going to bring this concept to life? How am I going to make fun of this or push it or do something crazy? And then I get all my costumes. I got all my wigs, I go to Goodwill, I go to Amazon and I get, I have a basement full of wigs. Let me just tell you that we literally have our entire basement devoted to my video studio and there's a whole room for wigs and costumes. And then what I do is I batch record. So I record all the funny characters and all the sketches and I record all of the RKA me on camera teaching. I have a hair and makeup woman come in, she does my hair and makeup for a few days. I just get it all out. And then I've got my content for pretty much a year almost. And then each week we typically release episodes every other week. Then it's easier to say I'm going to work on this 'cause I don't have to do it all from scratch. I don't have to write it, I don't have to film it. I just now have to edit it and produce it and get it ready to distribute, which is much less work than all of that. So that is how I stay honest and sustainable 'cause I know as an agency owner there are going to be weeks where I had tons on my plate. I have client demands, I have all the excuses to say I'm not going to produce an episode this week. But remember I started the show in part to walk my talk and model for my clients. Marketing is a marathon, I think you've said that it's not a sprint and so batching, pre-batching, the majority of the work or at least a big chunk of it at the beginning of the year or in chunks, let's say twice a year I do big batches, really helps me stay consistent throughout the rest of the year.

Josiah (19:42):

I love, too, that you've structured stuff around this idea and around the content that you're creating. Like you have a, you said you have a basement for your studio that you've to put this together. So you said you have a hair and make-up person come in. Who else is on your team? When you're thinking through these ideas, are you brainstorming with other people? Or is it just kind of all, you're a creative genius?

Rachael (20:03):

There is a little bit of brainstorming that goes on with my team, but I do have to be honest in terms of the majority of the show's production, 90% of it I would say falls on me. And that's been a strategic decision too, Josiah because it's like if I were to hire a video company to edit and produce the episodes at the level I'm doing, which I'm always improving, I'm not the best of the best, but you know, it would be, let's say maybe a $1,000, $1,500 per show per episode. That's not sustainable for me. I've developed the editing skills. I've chosen to do it in house cause this is the main way I'm building not only my agency brand, but my personal brand. And so it's a lot of time, right? And I've chosen to put that time into it. And I will admit, I admit this readily. Part of the investment of time that I put into awkward marketing is personally fulfilling and gratifying to me. Like this is what I do in part, not only as a business measure, but as a hobby, right? I'm fulfilling a creative, artistic part of myself and I think that's a big piece for small business. So, and this is what I preach, not just in terms of your content strategy, but just your marketing strategy in general. Small business owners need to be doing a lot of their own marketing in house, even if they delegate and outsource parts of it. Most small business owners cannot afford a full-time marketing team. So you're going to have to develop marketing skills whether you like it or not. If you want to succeed in this economy right now. I really urge people to find the places with their content that they derive joy because otherwise it's not going to be sustainable. You will burn out in six months or a year. You will get tired of it. And yeah, of course the dream for me is I love to get to the point that Awkward Marketing is at the place that I can afford a company to edit each episode to me for $1,500 a pop. And it doesn't hurt at all. It's like, yes, let's go. And that's the dream and that's the dream for most businesses is we want to get to the point where we can afford a full-time marketing team, but to get there, you have to become a marketer. And so find the places in your own content that do bring you personal joy because if it wasn't for the joy, I wouldn't spend those long hours doing this show, but I do consider it very, very worth it. Thank God I liked doing it.

Josiah (22:07):

Absolutely. That's great advice. It's the same thing for me with Content Heroes. We do the show mainly at this point because I love doing the show, not because it's bringing in a ton of business to the agency, but because it's something that I'm personally passionate about. And I get energized by having conversations with people like you and being able to share that with an audience. And so that's fantastic advice.

Rachael (22:30):

Yeah, Josiah and I want to jump in here and just add to this, which is that Awkward Marketing brings a ton of revenue into my agency. At this point, it's shifted slowly over the years from not giving us any money back. Right? It was just a pure, we were fully just invested in it and waiting for the returns. I've watched as the percentage of our customers that come in has risen in terms of how did they find us and was Awkward Marketing apart of their decision to become our clients. Right. And that's grown and grown over the years. I think a lot of marketers go wrong because they expect their content to give them huge returns right away and like you and Content Heroes, I can only assume that the longer you've done the show, the more ROI you've gotten from it and the more people you know out in the world that are like, Oh, I've seen your show or Hey, and so I want to encourage people, you know, with that marathon, not a sprint mentality. What I'd like to say is the content you create today is a gift you give your future self. This is a long game thing. And so I'm still at a place where it makes sense to spend 50 grand on Awkward Marketing. At this point in my agency, not because it's not bringing me 50 grand because it definitely is bringing me way more than 50 grand, but I mean are the margins there to the point that, you know, I want to spend that money just yet on somebody else taking this over? Not quite yet. But Awkward Marketing is definitely bringing us bigger and bigger returns all the time. And that's what I want to encourage people to think about with their marketing. You've gotta be thinking about it as an investment. It's not publish a podcast, make a sale. It's not publish a video, make a sale. That's not how this works. Right? It's not a direct cause and effect. So you gotta be in it for the long run.

Josiah (24:09):

I absolutely agree. I'm curious, how long do you think it was before you said you started to see that tipping point of Awkward Marketing actually bringing in more and more clients?

Rachael (24:18):

I would say maybe six to eight months before I started noticing. And I want to bring up something here about the job that my content does for me in addition to bringing in clients is one of the ways that I measure the success of the show is by how prepared my clients are to work with us within our system when they come in the door. So the job of Awkward Marketing, partially. Yeah, it's education, it's brand awareness, it's bringing in new clients, all these kinds of things. I'm trying to help people out there. Of course, that's another goal. One of the big goals of Awkward Marketing is to kind of prepare clients to be better clients. So when clients come in the door and they tell me they've watched a bunch of my show, I can feel a lot more confident that they're ready to be in the mindset of our process and to be better clients with us, which means we're not working as hard to gain their trust and to get them to listen to our expertise. We're not working as hard to get them to follow our process, therefore they're more successful and we're more profitable. So part of how I measure the value of Awkward Marketing isn't just how much business it brings me, but how much more profitable it is making my company because my customers are coming in educated, already indoctrinated into our worldview, and so that's another huge way that awkward marketing in that my content is paying me back, right? Not just terms of business, but in terms of the quality of the business I'm bringing it.

Josiah (25:41):

Oh, that's so great. It can be so easy for us to just focus on the numbers of like that direct ROI like the podcast or the YouTube channel is bringing in X amount of dollars, but there's a lot of, what do you call it, like soft ROI? I don't know, because there's a positioning in that education piece to it that you can't really measure in hard terms, but you notice when it's impacting your business. Exactly what you said. You notice when people are coming in, already familiar with you, the way you do work, they already see you as an authority and a leader. That makes them much, much more willing to just sort of sit back and let you do your thing and help them in the way that you're uniquely able to help them.

Rachael (26:21):

Yeah.

Josiah (26:21):

Rachel, one of the things I'm curious about is what's your distribution strategy look like? Are you focused on just one particular platform or are you kind of spreading it out? What does that look like?

Rachael (26:33):

Yeah, so we do follow the 80/20 rule. Derek Halpern's 80/20 rule of 20% of the time is focused on creating new content. 80% of the time is focused on distributing and promoting that content. So yeah, we're on almost every social platform, some to more extreme degrees, right? And I'm all about the layering approach. I'm always encouraging with my own clients, start with one platform, get really good at that platform, and then like layer on the next and layer on the next. And so that's what we've done with social over the years. But one thing that's kind of unique about our distribution strategy with this video show is that we're not wholly obsessed and focused on building a YouTube audience. And so when we distribute the show, we're posting it natively on every social platform that we can, so we post it natively on YouTube. Obviously, there's no other way, but we post it natively on YouTube and then we post it natively on Facebook. We don't share it on Facebook via the YouTube link. Right. We're going to post it originally from Facebook, and from LinkedIn, and from Instagram. Those are kind of our main places. The one place that I'm not super crazy about is Twitter. So LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram. Those are our kind of main things, a little bit on Pinterest because the goal Josiah is not to build a YouTube audience, although certainly that's a goal. The goal is that as many people see the show as possible. I want as many people to see my face and hear this message as they can because we invested so much in every episode and that's what we've done to get the biggest reach that we can. And it's just made such a difference to do it that way. Because I find that when people take their content and they only focus on one platform and then they try to drive everyone back to that platform, they lose, they lose people there. And our monetization strategy is not to build a YouTube channel that we put ads on. So in that way, we're not as concerned with our subscriber numbers on YouTube and our YouTube views because we don't see that as being the growth strategy, if you will. Our growth strategy is we want as many people to know about and see and be served by and helped by Awkward Marketing as possible, which helps the brand in so many ways. So yeah, that's how we do distribution. And we'll take one episode, and we'll rerun it throughout the year. We'll find different ways to position it. We'll turn it into like 20 different pieces of content, right? A blog post, and infographics, and eBooks, and Instagram stories, and gifs. That's my big secret is I've got a massive gif presence. At this point, as of recording I have 160 million gif views and counting. So watch me work, baby.

Josiah (29:03):

What? That's amazing.

Rachael (29:03):

So every single episode turns into a blog, and an email, and a bunch of gifs, and an Instagram graphic and like a ton of content comes from one single episode. And that's super important. Another piece about the distribution that I'll keep in mind is that we try to focus on content that's evergreen so that because it's so high production, because we're spending so much on every single episode, I need to know that the episode I'm producing today will still be valuable in two years, and searchable, and findable, and enjoyable in two years. So there you go.

Josiah (29:33):

Yeah. I feel like we could probably chat all day, but we need to actually get back to doing "work". I really appreciate you being on the show. Before we hop off here, can you share with everybody where they can find you and Awkward Marketing online?

Rachael (29:47):

AwkwardMarketing.com; AwkwardMarketing.tv; AwkwardMarketing.gov. Actually, the last one we do not, but the first two. You can go find us AwkwardMarketing.com. And if you're curious about how to use this, the idea of taking the stuff that pisses you off and turning it into great content, I do have an episode of the show and a little guide on what I call reverse-niching, which is taking the stuff that makes you mad and turning it into your superpower. And you can go to R-K-I-N-K, that's RKA Ink, the name of my agency RKAink.com/niche. That's RKAink.com/niche and you'll get a really hilarious episode of Awkward Marketing and a guide for creating your own epic unforgettable content.

Josiah (30:30):

Fantastic. This has been great. You head banging there? Oh, I'm feeling that. Normally I have coffee in the mornings from this machine in our building. And they've closed down all the amenities in our building ,and so I don't have any coffee and I'm just like, I don't know what to do with myself in the mornings anymore.

Rachael (30:48):

I am your coffee now. Josiah. I am human caffeine.

Josiah (30:52):

All right, well, until next time everyone. Go be a hero.

Josiah (30:56):

Hey everyone, thank you for listening to the Content Heroes podcast. I just wanted to take a second and let you know that we have some amazing guests planned for the coming weeks. So if you haven't already, go ahead and hit subscribe so you can make sure to catch every episode. And if you enjoyed today's episode, go ahead and leave a five-star review to help make it easier for other content creators to find and enjoy the show. Lastly, I'd like to invite you to join our Content Heroes Facebook community where you can connect with other online content creators to share, learn, grow, and have fun. To join the group, just visit contentheroes.com/facebook. Once again, that is contentheroes.com/facebook.

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